Presenting
Alt.religion.scientology Week in Review

Volume 9, Issue 44 - November 5 2005


Scientology at the mall

Scientology set up shop at the mall in Citrus Park, according to an article by Stephanie Hayes in the October 30, 2005 St. Petersburg Times.

http://www.sptimes.com/2005/10/30/Northoftampa/Teaching_Scientology_.shtml

"...The church's Life Improvement Center will fill the spot vacated by Castaldi's Market & Grill near the food court until January.

The mall is looking for a new restaurant to take over after that, mall marketing director Mary Ellen Norton said.

Castaldi's plush seating remains, and copies of Scientology books including Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health, by church founder L. Ron Hubbard, are on sale.

A sign for a 'free stress test' hangs in the window. Two or three church members work at the store.

[...]

In University Mall, where church members run a kiosk and sometimes approach shoppers who pass by, some have complained, general manager Tom Locke said.

But, he added, 'I don't think they realize how many different religions do use malls. There are Christian book stores all over the place.'

[...]

Harney said the church doesn't plan to open a kiosk in Westfield Citrus Park Mall after the Life Improvement Center closes, but added, 'Then again, things could change.'"

Message-ID: 43648334@news2.lightlink.com


Churches push irreligious Scientology

from http://www.sptimes.com/2005/10/30/Tampabay/Spiritual_symbiosis__.shtml

According to another post, the October 30 St. Petersburg Times also published an article about an alliance between Scientology and

"... the Glorious Church of God in Christ, a predominantly African-American church in a working class neighborhood of East Tampa.

The teens bow their heads and pray Jesus will make this a productive evening. Then one hands out pamphlets titled The Way to Happiness.

'Be worthy of trust' is the passage the kids read before launching into a discussion of moral issues touching on race, sex and honesty.

The concepts aren't unusual for a Christian teen group, but the author is. The Way to Happiness is a moral code written by L. Ron Hubbard, founder of Scientology.

And the Way to Happiness class is just part of a relationship between the Glorious Church of God in Christ and the Church of Scientology.

About 20 Glorious Church members have been schooled on Hubbard's study technology at Scientology's Tampa facility on Habana Avenue. Soon Glorious Church parishioners plan to teach Hubbard's so-called 'study tech' to children in their neighborhood, where one in five live in poverty.

The Glorious Church also hopes to host Narconon and Criminon programs based on the teachings of Hubbard and aimed at drug treatment and criminal rehabilitation.

[...]

Next month, Glorious Church parishioners will begin tutoring neighborhood kids through an afterschool program known as Bright Sky. The federal No Child Left Behind law requires Hillsborough school officials to use public money for private afterschool programs, which will get up to $1,300 per child.

Although Bright Sky is not connected to the Church of Scientology and does not use Hubbard's study tech, it was created by Scientologists as a for-profit company.

[...]

Glorious Church of God in Christ started with a five-person prayer group and was chartered in 1980. Kennedy has been its pastor from the start.

Kennedy said he learned about Scientology while in Clearwater for a business deal unrelated to his church last year. He met Ed Best, a Scientologist and president of Ebony Awakenings, a small chapter of black Scientologists.

Kennedy attended an Ebony Awakenings banquet and learned about various Hubbard-inspired programs. He knew of the church's often-controversial image, but his brother-in-law got off drugs through Narconon, he said.

So Kennedy and about 20 others from his 154-member church began taking weekly courses at the Church of Scientology in Tampa, located in two renovated cigar factories on Habana Avenue.

Kennedy said he cried when he took one course on learning.

'Where has this been all my life?' he asked.

Kennedy's wife, Yolanda, calls the basic study tech 'one of the most exciting courses I've taken.'

But she draws the line when it comes to Scientology's 'auditing' sessions and other religious practices.

'I'm of a different spiritual persuasion,' she said. 'I'm very happy with the balance I have between the two of them.'

Pastor Kennedy said he doesn't worry that some of his flock may decide to become Scientologists.

'One thing I appreciate' about Scientologists is 'they don't care what your faith is,' he said. 'They don't recruit people.'

[...]

Kennedy isn't the only local pastor planning to use the study tech.

Archbishop Clarence Davis of Joy Tabernacle Cathedral in Tampa's Ybor City heard about the Hubbard programs from Kennedy and also is a fan.

Davis said he thought Scientologists were 'kooks' before he took a course on learning how to learn. Despite holding three graduate degrees, Davis said the program taught him a lot. The religion of Scientology has been a non-issue, he said.

'I'm happy because they don't push the religious aspects,' he said. 'If they did, I wouldn't be involved.'

Eight members of his church are training to become instructors in the Hubbard methods, Davis said.

[...]

This year, the Hillsborough School district will funnel more than $8-million to private afterschool programs.

The Bright Sky program - to be taught in a building behind Kennedy's church - will not employ Hubbard's study technology, he said. Rather, it is a phonics-based program devised by Scientologists.

'It so happens they are Scientologists,' Kennedy said. 'But Bright Sky is not Scientology. It's just education.'

Brendan Haggerty, CEO of Bright Sky Learning, said his company's program does not include any study tech. Glorious Church members were certified to teach the Bright Sky program at the Church of Scientology in Tampa only because they were taking other courses there and they asked to do it there, he said.

But there is potential for confusion. Asked whether Glorious Church tutors would incorporate Hubbard study tech concepts like 'word clearing' into the Bright Sky program, Yolanda Kennedy said they would. Haggerty said she was mistaken.

[...]

But the afterschool tutoring program will not bring as much as hoped. As of Friday, only nine eligible students had selected the Bright Sky program at Glorious Church. Haggerty said Glorious Church's take will be about $900 per student, out of which it must pay the tutors. The church had hoped for as many as 100 students, so the enrollment is disappointing, Haggerty said, but he noted it is an off-campus program in its first year.

Kennedy said he anticipates Scientologists will help donate money to build his church's new community center. Once built, the center will be a place where neighborhood kids can experience the Hubbard learning methods, he said.

[...]

And just before the Monday night meeting ended with a prayer, Yolanda Kennedy made sure each student had a second Way to Happiness booklet.

'Make sure,' she said, 'you give that book to someone tomorrow.'"

Message-ID: 00h9m1tceldqsnql79hk18c55o916lmt02@4ax.com


Cafepress confronts cult

According to a post from "Barb" on October 31, 2005, an RTC attorney "has notified cafepress that a number of people are selling stuff with the word Scientology on it.

She seems to object."

"Barb" continued her post November 1.

"One was the complaint from Aviary Parakeet [Ava Paquette, a Scientology attorney]. It starts out in the usual manner; 'Our office represents Religious Technology Center ('RTC'), the owner of the trademark and service marks of the Scientology religion.'

Miz. Parakeet continues, ‘Please be advised that a number of your customers are currently selling merchandise, including, but not limited to t-shirts, cups, buttons and posters which display the trademarks referred to above on their merchandise, without the authorization of our clients. Because there are so many infringements, I have attached the URLs where these can be found, below. The use of our client's trademarks in this manner has caused your name to be falsely associated with our client's registered marks as owner and creates a likelihood of confusion as to the source or sponsorship of these products and web pages in violation of United States state and federal law, including the Lanham Act, 15 U.S.C. 1125(a).

[...]

The second pdf file is cafepress' response. It starts out pretty tasty, Thank you for your October 27, 2005 notification regarding rights by a user of our service. We have reviewed the shops your client’s websites and trademark registrations. We have however, CafePress.com will not accede to your demands.'

The writer then goes on to explain why the various stuff on CafePress sites couldn't possibly be confused with the religion, why these sites are not committing infringement, legal stuff, attayattayatta.

The upshot; CafePress removed 8 items from the long list provided by Paquette. I checked, and there are still numerous items sporting the word 'Scientology' still available on cafepress, and most of them are critical. [...]"

--

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Message-ID: 4367cfb8$1@news2.lightlink.com


E-book on Amazon.com

On November 1, 2005, Andreas Heldal-Lund posted about an E-book on Amazon.com.

"Downloadable PDF book on www.amazon.com for $3.99:

Scientology: What do they believe? [DOWNLOAD: PDF] (long link)

A couple of reviews:

'This review was fascinating! Nothing less. Most never knew L. Ron Hubbard was a two-bit criminal and fabricated many aspects of his life. ...'

[...]

'...otherwise it's a complete waist of time and money (and yes, three dollars is far more than what this PDF is worth). Val Waldeck accomplishes nothing in this 'publication' other than to state very clearly that Jesus Christ is the only one you should believe in. ... '.?"

Message-ID: mlrdm11vocokncjb4n739f5rk62skgugtf@4ax.com


Armstrong seeks rehearing

On November 2, 2005, Gerry Armstrong posted about a Petition for Rehearing, Scientology v. Armstrong, CA CoA, Case No. A107095

"Webbed with links at: http://www.gerryarmstrong.org/50grand/legal/a7/appeal/pet-rehearing-2005-11-02.html

Case No. A107095]
[Consolidated with Case No. A107100]

COURT OF APPEAL OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA

FIRST APPELLATE DISTRICT, DIVISION FOUR

CHURCH OF SCIENTOLOGY INTERNATIONAL,
a California nonprofit religious corporation,

Petitioner,

vs.

SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF MARIN,

Respondent.

GERALD ARMSTRONG,

Real Party in Interest.

Marin County Superior Court Case No. 157680/152229,
Consolidated with Case No. CV 021632.

PETITION FOR REHEARING

[...]

iii

COURT OF APPEAL OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA

FIRST APPELLATE DISTRICT, DIVISION FOUR

CHURCH OF SCIENTOLOGY INTERNATIONAL,
a California nonprofit religious corporation,

Petitioner,

vs.

SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF MARIN,

Respondent.

GERALD ARMSTRONG,
Real Party in Interest.

[Consolidated with Case No. A107100]

Marin County Superior Court Case No. 157680/152229,
Consolidated with Case No. CV 021632.

PETITION FOR REHEARING

Real party in interest Gerry Armstrong 'Armstrong' hereby petitions for a rehearing of this Court's decision of October 19, 2005 granting Scientology's petition for writ of certiorari or mandate. Armstrong respectfully submits that this Court committed factual and legal errors, which, if corrected, would require this Court to affirm the trial court's May 20, 2004 order re sentences, or to direct the trial court to conduct a contractual unconscionability evidentiary hearing.

I. Factual Errors

The most gargantuan factual error in this Court's decision is its removal and isolation of the few provided facts, some misleading and some flat out erroneous, from the real picture, from the real context, and from all that context's real facts. This Court's slim and erroneous facts and its avoidance of enormous sections of relevant reality create the appearance in reality of conscious cruelty.

No one is more aware of the facts, of course, than Armstrong, and he is factually indisputably Scientology's target and victim in this case and far beyond. He has an inalienable human right to not be persecuted, and everything he writes and says is a proclamation that he cannot be persecuted. The California Courts' files, and the record in this Court alone, document the reality he lives and discusses beyond any rational argument. This reality can be ignored, as this Court has done, but the reality cannot be opposed or argued against, since arguing against something requires addressing it. This Court improperly ignored reality and improperly made itself the trier of fact within the unreality left over in order to do what this Court, possessing the record it possessed, knew was unconscionable, apparently because it is unconscionable.

[...]

This Court has committed significant factual errors throughout its decision by trying to make this case and the matter before this Court appear far more about the faceless corporate fiction CSI than the case and matter really are.

It is uncontroverted that all of the beneficiaries including CSI are under the control of one person David Miscavige ('Miscavige'), who succeeded Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard ('Hubbard') as supreme director of the Scientology enterprise after Hubbard's death in 1986. RApp. 14:24,25; 260:25-28. Miscavige, as Scientology director, is also clearly a beneficiary, and as the supreme director of Scientology he is the sole beneficiary-maker. If Miscavige decides to assign the benefits of the Armstrong contract to every entity and every person in the world, every entity and person in the world becomes a beneficiary.

[...]

Armstrong does not know if someone on this Court, or perhaps the whole panel, are agents of Scientology, and there has been no showing that he does know. As this Court is aware, the Scientology enterprise in its core and in operation is an intelligence organization, RApp. 258:27-259-5, and it has had agents in the U.S. justice system at least as early as the 1970's. See, e.g., U.S. v. Heldt, 215 U.S.App.D.C. 206. Clearly Scientology has agents and beneficiaries in the judiciary.

In technical fact, because Scientology is at war with Armstrong and his religious class of 'Suppressive Persons,' any apparent wogs such as this Court that so clearly abet Scientology's efforts to harm an SP, cannot but be considered Scientology's agents. Armstrong has defined the terms 'wogs,' 'Suppressive Persons' or 'SPs, and the related terms of 'fair game,' and 'black propaganda' or 'black PR' in the record before this Court. See, e.g., RB, pp. 1,2, n.1,2, p. 4. R. App. 258:12-262:14.

[...]

This Court acts as if it believes it has the authority to punish Armstrong in California for his religious expressions outside the U.S. This issue is clearly what the case and record in this Court are all about, even though this Court completely avoids the issue. This Court clearly desires to punish Armstrong, even to the extent of inventing facts to help it achieve a result already ruled unconscionable. This Court is accomplishing Armstrong's punishment, moreover, by willfully failing to address the facts and laws that challenge and in fact bar this Court's assumption of the jurisdiction it has assumed.

[...]

This Court does not mention that Armstrong is a member of a psychoterrorized religious class, the 'Suppressive Persons' or 'SPs,' or even mention the SPs at all. This Court says nothing about the 'Suppressive Person' doctrine, which is undeniably religious as the key doctrine in Scientology religious scripture that directs Scientology's and Scientologists aggressive, dishonest and threatening actions toward Armstrong. He provided a wealth of evidence about the SP doctrine and its application as 'fair game' in the record before this Court, which this Court ignores. See, e.g., Opp. Pp. 23-26, RApp. 258:12-262:14. This Court doesn't mention that Armstrong's wife is a declared SP, that Scientology declared Armstrong an SP in 1982, and considered him an SP at all times he expressed the subject religious expressions.

[...]

If Armstrong is right, he is justified in expressing his religious expressions because the First Amendment guarantees his free exercise of his religion, Judge Duryee is justified in remitting the punishment for those expressions, and this Court is not justified in reinstating that punishment. If Armstrong is wrong, then his mistake about the First Amendment's religion clause is an honest one that virtually every American shares.

Armstrong also states his belief that the contractual terms Scientology seeks to enforce against him could not lawfully be enforced in Canada, because they are an impermissible deprivation of Armstrong's fundamental freedoms in violation of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms. Opp. 7-9 If he is honestly mistaken, or if he is right, about these human rights charters outside the U.S., he was justified in expressing all the religious expressions he expressed in Canada and in Europe, Judge Duryee was justified in remitting his sentence for his expressions, and this Court is not justified in reinstating that sentence.

[...]

II. Legal Errors

The most colossal legal error in this Court's decision, is its improper use of a few very limited, and here virtually irrelevant, slivers of law, selected by Scientology to govern the case, in order to pronounce that Judge Duryee lacked the authority to remit the punishment against Armstrong, while this Court completely ignores the clear and powerful California statute, C.C.C.§1670.5, which specifically gave her that authority in exactly that circumstance.

34

What she did in every way confirmed that she possessed, and knew she possessed, the authority that statute gave her to avoid an unconscionable result. She remitted the sentences. If she had not, she would have failed to act to avoid a result that appeared to her unconscionable after her conscience was shocked. Her conscience was shocked when she grasped the facts in the record before her, which this Court religiously and improperly evades and alters.

Judge Duryee clearly applied C.C.C.§1670.5 to limit the application of the contract's liquidated damages penalty and limit the application of the contract's silence requirement to avoid both unconscionable results that Scientology sought in the consolidated trial or hearing. Armstrong argued in some breadth in his briefs that C.C.C.§1670.5 was the law to be applied in the case, in both Scientology's appeal and in its writ petition.

Armstrong argued that if Scientology was dissatisfied with its punishment of him being ruled unconscionable, its recourse by law was not to try to get this Court to pronounce the unconscionable conscionable, which, perversely, this Court has done. Scientology's remedy was to avail itself of the opportunity C.C.C.§1670.5 afforded a party in Scientology's shoes to present evidence on the contract's commercial setting, purpose and effect to get the Marin Court to change its mind about the unconscionability rulings. If after the hearing on the contract's commercial setting, purpose and effect the Marin Court still found the unconscionable contract unconscionable, then Scientology could seek review of that judgment in the Court of Appeal.

Instead and improperly, without availing itself of a C.C.C.§1670.5 hearing, Scientology filed an appeal to get this Court to reverse the judgment limiting the unconscionable result of the application of the liquidated damages clause, and filed a writ petition to get this Court to vacate the order discharging the unconscionable result of the application of the contract's injunctive relief clause. This Court ignores the statute and Armstrong's arguments thereon utterly, which is more shocking than just fishy, and worse, this Court does so in order to inflict the unconscionable.

[...]

III. Conclusion

Armstrong asks this Court to examine its consciences and the record, set this matter for rehearing, and/or deny Scientology's writ petition, and/or direct the Marin Superior Court to conduct an evidentiary hearing in compliance with C.C.C.§1670.5.

Dated: November 1, 2005

Gerry Armstrong

[...]"

Message-ID: 6nbim1hul2fgqahjrctenlr4dq5abdjusl@4ax.com


Advance publicity for Cruise biography

The following was posted anonymously to the news group on November 3, 2005.

"Eyes wide open: Biographer digging for info on Cruise

A Tom Cruise bio by the author of books on Princess Diana, Madonna and Monica Lewinsky is bound to upset the defenders of his faith at the Church of Scientology.

Tom Cruise has a new biographer - even though he probably doesn't want one. Andrew Morton - who scaled the best-seller lists with books about Princess Diana, Madonna and Monica Lewinsky - is digging for fresh bits about the diminutive box-office Goliath.

A source at St. Martin's Press, which published the Lewinsky and Madonna books, tells us it hopes to bring out the book next fall, but the house doesn't seem eager to bugle the deal.

That could be because Morton, who enjoyed the full cooperation of Di and Monica, is not likely to get much from Cruise. In fact, Morton is probably bracing himself for interference from the actor's protectors at the Church of Scientology.

Last week at an L.A. restaurant, the former Daily Mail reporter was spotted debriefing private eye Paul Barresi and attorney Graham Berry, reports radaronline.com.

[...]"

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/gossip/story/357110p-304334c.html

Message-ID: 1131004799.648945.120700@g47g2000cwa.googlegroups.com


Today Show segment

On November 3, 2005 "Batchild" posted

"A transcript of today's 'Today Show' segment about Scientology is now available at:

http://members.cox.net/batchild1/transcript/today.htm

Note: NBC has the video of the segment at:

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/3032633/

Where it says 'More Today Show video', it's clip 5 of 15."

Comments on the show posted to the news group included the following.

"[Tory] The Supposed President of C of S just said on MrKABC that she totally respects other religions, and is always amazed that others cannot respect her religion, and what she believes.

[...]

But more importantly, I don't care about her beliefs. She can believe whatever she wants.

[...]

What *I* care about is
Scientology trying to stop free speech
Scientology lying to people (Just as she has tonight)
Scientology Practicing Fair Game
Scientology practicing medical abuse
Scientology and fraud
Scientology using Kids as slaves
Scientology practicing disconnection and breaking up families

None of those have to do with religion, as far as I'm concerned ..."

--

To an anonymous poster's question:

"He [Scientology spokesman Mike Rinder] says there's 10 million members! LOL! Where are they? "

"Hartley Patterson" responded

"...If a CoS spokesperson says 'millions of members' to you, ask to see his IAS membership card. Membership of the International Association of Scientologists is required for services to be taken in the CoS.

The rightmost eight digits are a cumulative member number. That number will not be more than 150,000. People who have died or left the CoS since 1984 are still part of that total, so the actual number of members must be smaller.

Now rephrase that question. 'How many IAS members are there?'"

--

In response to

"Mike Rinder, Director of CSI: 'right now there is no litigation in the United States whatsoever. There are no legal cases at all.'"

Gerry Armstrong posted on November 4, 2005:

(long link)
11/03/2005 Rehearing petition filed.

Petition with links:
http://www.gerryarmstrong.org/50grand/legal/a7/appeal/pet-rehearing-2005-11-02.html

(Covered in this week's review under "Armstrong asks for rehearing")

--

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References: PA3ACW1F38660.7426851852@anonymous.poster
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Wollersheim Collection report

On November 5, 2005, Lermanet.com posted "Scientology OSA Farny caught jury tampering Nov 2005 - Wollersheim"

"Introduction: This is the first entry in my Wollersheim Collection Ongoing Trial blog relating to my nearly completed collection efforts against the destructive mind control cult Scientology. This blog is dedicated to informing the world of Scientology’s real nature and to counter the efforts of Tom Cruise, John Travolta and other Hollywood celebrities who are promoting this dangerous mind control cult. It is also dedicated to help educate, heal and encourage the hundreds of thousands of people who have been harmed by Scientology and other cults all over the world to use the legal system to get justice and restitution. If you are new the history of the 25 year litigation conflict and the previous success of my collection efforts see http://www.factnet.org/Healing.html#Litigation and the link called Special Update on 8.6 Million Dollar Wollersheim Scientology Collection Success and Refund Success Tips for Ex-Scientologists…

What Happened in Day 1 and 2 of Wollersheim collection trial in LA on Nov 2-3:

As you would expect in any trial involving Scientology and myself it started off with a bang. A senior intelligence operative of Scientology’s OSA division (who is also the wife of Lynn Farney or Varney one of Scientology’s highest ranking executives) was caught trying to tamper with the jury over a two day period.

After the tampering was discovered the judge had the sheriff’s deputies detain this woman on day two and issued her a court order that she be barred from the courthouse then had her photographed and escorted by several sheriffs out of the court house. The judge was then required to interview each juror and as far as we are in the process this is what various jurors have said:

Here's how it came down according to juror sworn testimony.

1.) This female OSA agent moved from prospective juror group to group in hall outside the court room.

2.) It was she that She spoke first to the Prospective Juror..

3.) She said knew me Lawrence Wollersheim for 20 years and she had an extraordinary amount of information about my litigation history.

[...]

This whole discovery of the Scientology jury tampering came about because I sat down next to this high ranking Scientology covert intelligence operative in the hall outside the courtroom to send her a clear signal I will not be intimidated by the previous death threats on me and my family ordered by and with the knowledge of the very highest officials of Scientology (her husband included). While sitting next to her to send my no fear signal, I did not realize that I should not also be sitting near prospective jurors. While sitting there as a temporary diversion from the silence and the obvious weird energy coming from the busted Scientology covert operative, I asked the person on the other side of me only about their Blackberry PDA and how they liked it.

Later when I was being legitimately and properly chastised by the judge for sitting near prospective jurors and asking anything no matter how unrelated it was to the case, one or more of the jurors started talking about some sloppy and overweight woman talking to them about the case. My inadvertent comment to the prospective juror almost as an act of Providence, unearthed Scientology’s criminal and intentional jury tampering scheme.

[...]

I do believe the judge is an honest and fair man trying to do his best. Like anyone new to the horrors of scientology and coming to grips with the fact that Scientology runs a CIA like intelligence division with a covert operations budget greater than many small countries around the world, it is going to take him a while to come up to speed and get it.

I sincerely do not believe the judge yet fully understands that Scientology is here in full covert opps force to sabotage his court, deadlock or influence the jury and stop me from collecting the last of my judgment --- all because they fear hundreds of millions of dollars in new lawsuits from Scientology victims all over the world when they hear that every thin dime of the 87 million this dimes they were ordered to pay me was paid.

[...]

More in my next trial update blog when I can get it done. I will not be able to answer individual email during the trial.

[...]

Lawrence Wollersheim ..."

Message-ID: bt6om1h8eh1b5jfn1h4okii7t1d52eitve@4ax.com


Psychiatrist editorializes on Cruise

On November 5, 2005 Lermanet.com also posted a historical article by Louis Jolyon West, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry, UCLA School of Medicine on Tom Cruise

"Southern California PSYCHIATRIST
Guest Editorial
scientology III
by Louis Jolyon West, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry, UCLA School of Medicine

in previous articles in this newsletter (July, 1990 and May, 1991), I described how the Church of Scientology strives constantly to gain the appearance of respectability and to attract new members, as well as to discredit its critics. What follows is a continuation of that account, with special emphasis on Scientology's front groups, the purposes of which are to improve its credibility with the public, and to create new avenues for recruitment of members and generation of income.

L. Ron Hubbard long believed that celebrities could be useful in helping to promote Scientology. He dictated special efforts to recruit the most viable and successful people. In the 1950s Scientology tried unsuccessfully to recruit such public figures as Marlene Ilietrich, Edward R Murrow, Ernest fiemingway, Greta Garbo and Howard Hughes. Finally in the 1970s the actor John Travolta and the football star John Brodie credited their success to Scientology.

Since then other performers such as Tom Cruise and Kirstie Alley have publicly praised the Church. A network of 'celebrity centres' has been established throughout the world for such members to gather and to help in the recruitment of new members. The most famous of these is Hollywood's Celebrity Centre International, formerly the Manor Hotel, an enormous and magnificent mansion built in the 1920s.

[...]

As a psychiatrist, who has for many years studied the practices of totalist cults, and noted the often harmful effects of these depredations upon cult members and their families, I continue to observe the actions of the Church of Scientology to recruit new members, silence critics, and gain political and economic influence through deliberate deception, misinformation, concealment, distraction, and harassment. It seems to me that there should be potent social and legal remedies to combat the Church of Scientology, deriving both from the recent evolution of a consumer protection tradition (as exemplified in the health field) and from the older legal matrix of redress for damages and civil wrongs.

Our laws and codes of ethics accept the vulnerability of people to intimidation and deception. They also accept the possibility that relationships of special trust (such as those enjoyed by physicians, nurses, psychologists, social workers, attorneys, ministers, etc.) may be improperly exploited. Disillusioned and damaged 'consumers' of the Hubbard method should be able to sue not only the Church of Scientology but also Narconon, Sterling Management, and other Scientology front organizations for damages done and losses endured.

[...]"

Message-ID: 4h3om19in026aujv0mkqp6uuhteam2dbiu@4ax.com


Inside Cult Castle

"4 November 2005
MIRROR INVESTIGATES: INSIDE CULT CASTLE
THE WEIRD RITUALS AT SCIENTOLOGY'S SUSSEX HQ
By David Edwards

THE trainee Scientologist clasps two tin cans which are connected by wires to an electric dial.

A second, more senior member reads from a prompt card.

'Have you ever destroyed a culture?' he asks. 'Have you ever bred bodies for degrading purposes? Did you come to Earth for evil purposes?''

Down the corridor, another sect member listens to a series of lectures on how, 75 million years ago, an alien prince killed millions of people with atom bombs.

We are inside St Hill Manor, a small fortress in the West Sussex stockbroker belt, a rambling mansion that houses the British nerve-centre of the controversial Church Of Scientology.

[...]

Announcing the new drive, Scientology chief David Miscavige said: 'History is about to be made in one of the most important... cities on Earth. We are about to drive home the message 'This Is Scientology' like you have never seen.'

According to former Scientologist Bonnie Woods, 56, who now runs a counselling service for ex-members, Britain is seen as ripe for conversion.

'Make no mistake, the people at the top of Scientology see us as a huge untapped well of easy converts, where many people are apathetic to mainstream religion and have large disposable incomes.

'These are exactly the sort of people they want. They're called 'raw meat'.'

[...]"

(long link)

--

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